For ‘Save Your Vision Month’, Set Your Sights on Eye Protection

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As most people who wear glasses know, getting an eye exam is really easy to put off. Going to your optometrist can be a hassle as you juggle running out of contacts and scheduling an exam, so it is actually covered by insurance. Since going to the eye doctor is quite expensive, many people wonder “do I need an eye exam to get new glasses?” – the answer is no, if your most recent exam was in the last couple of years.

You do need an eye exam to get new contacts so many contact lense wearers are searching “can you get eye exam online?”. The good news is you can book eye appointment online, even if you need bifocals, have an astigmatism, or have bionocular vision disorders where your eyes cannot align properly. You can sign up for an online eye exam or book optometrist online through many different websites. While you can get updated prescriptions from an online eye exam, it is important to remember to physically get your eyes checked every few years just to be sure you get the glaucoma test as early detection means better treatment.

Forget the Ides of March. This month, it’s all about the “Eyes” of March.

That’s because March is national Save Your Vision Month, so says the Optometry Cares organization, an offshoot of the American Optometric Association. The month has been designated as a way “to remind Americans of the importance of eye health and regular exams.” And reports show we could use a few reminders.

A study from 2011 found that half of all people surveyed don’t schedule vision and eye exams at least once a year. What’s even more striking is that of those that actually book regular appointments, half said they don’t discuss ways of protecting their eyes with their doctors. Luckily, we have a few tips here on how to take better care of your eyes all year long — not just during Save Your Vision Month.

Symptoms that seem slight, like headaches and blurriness, can be signs of larger vision troubles.
Symptoms that seem slight, like headaches and blurriness, can be signs of larger vision troubles.

One of the most clear signs that something is wrong with your vision is that you can’t quite see the blackboard at school or the newspaper right in front of you. These might not be obvious right away, but when they pop up, they still require a trip to the doctor, and the sooner the better. Even symptoms that seem slight, like headaches and blurriness, can be signs of larger vision troubles.

A new study has revealed that vision troubles can even extend to women during pregnancy. A blog post at FoxNews.com cites a case study of a young expectant mother suffering from blurred vision and flashes of light in both eyes who, after medical examination, was found to be suffering from preeclampsia, a pregnancy complication that results in high blood pressure. The woman was forced to deliver her baby prematurely, but the child lived. And the mother’s preeclampsia disappeared as soon as she wasn’t pregnant anymore.

The last tip comes courtesy of Ingra Gardner, a columnist at the Highlands Today publication in Florida, and involves something none of us particularly like to think about: aging. Gardner writes that just like with other health concerns, maintaining a balanced diet and getting enough exercise can help stave off long-term eye deterioration as we get older. Additionally, scientists have linked disorders like diabetes and high blood pressure with vision problems especially because they may require certain medications that could have eye-related side effects.

So whether you’re suffering from headaches, blurred vision or even dangerously high blood pressure, you might have vision problems to blame for all your troubles — or vice versa. That’s why you can never take even the slightest set of symptoms for granted when it comes to lasting eye health. After all, that’s what Save Your Vision Month is all about.

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